Plz do abide to our Terms & Condition:

    • Do not paste URL Links directly in any content instead post them as Hyperlink inside a text.
       
    • To post a Link directly use instead Bookmark.
       
    • If we find anyone posting beyond the warning we will immediately terminate your account without any warning. 

    Coronavirus Covid19 Awareness
     

             Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Don't be mislead by any Social Media or unauthorized websites which may have harmful medical misinformation. Find more information in our Awareness Page

Activity

  • Mobile app is a magical tool that makes life easier, faster and colorful. A highly interactive mobile app makes you delighted when you are a user and makes your customers delighted when you are a business owner.

    Website Development company in Mohali

    • STAT Times
      STAT Times shared a link
      IATA postpones 2020 AGM and World Air Transport Summit
      • STAT Times
        STAT Times shared a link
        Bolloré Logistics, ABC Airlines fly urgent pharma charter to Beijing
        • STAT Times
          STAT Times shared a link
          va-Q-tec's VIPs enter NASA's FRIDGE
        • If you need no longer of services and want to delete POF account but don't know how to cancel POF subscription then call us at +1 877-578-9345.

          How To Delete Or Cancel POF (Plenty Of Fish) Account
          • STAT Times
            STAT Times shared a link
            • Entertainer

              image

              Believe it or not, Hulu’s series of original horror films under the “Into the Dark” banner has its first sequel! Nacho Vigalondo’s “Pooka!” gets a tongue-in-cheek update in “Pooka Lives!,” a movie that’s at its best when it seems to be playfully mocking its very existence and is less effective when it tries to be a commentary on the poisonous nature of internet virality. For the most part, the better “Into the Dark” episodes have had a dark sense of humor, and a film that turns a childhood toy into a slasher villain has to have a heady dose of that to work. Sadly, the promise of the first half of “Pooka Lives!” doesn’t really pay off in the second half or the non-ending, but there’s still enough to like here to place it in the top tier of “Into the Dark” movies, and allow us to look forward to the inevitable “Pooka: A New Beginning!”

              The first film was about a man who was forced to dress as the latest hit child’s toy, a creepy teddy bear named Pooka, and how the job might have driven him crazy. The second film ignores the first movie’s entire existence other than its creepy Furby-esque title character, opening with the creator (Rachel Bloom) of the Pooka doll, after being fired by the company, murdering her husband and then lighting herself on fire. The urban legend goes that the Pooka mask she was wearing melted to her face. It’s a crazy opening scene that ends with the word LIVES being lit on fire across the screen like an old “Friday the 13th” sequel.

              But “Pooka Lives” is not just about a slasher in the form of a giant, red-eyed teddy bear (although it may have been better if it was). Director Alejandro Brugués (“Juan of the Dead”) tackles the very concept of virality via a man returning to his hometown after being targeted by internet trolls. Derrick (Malcolm Barrett) made the mistake of writing a book about shallow online personalities and pissed of a really powerful one named Jax, who now launches his horde against Derrick every day. Derrick moves in with a couple of old friends (Felicia Day & Jonah Ray) and gets a job working with an ex (Lyndie Greenwood) on the Pooka marketing team. One night after a few hash brownies, they get the idea to try to make their own viral Pooka event, starting something called the Pooka Challenge. They’re essentially trying to create their own Momo or Slenderman through the legend of Pooka and its homicidal creator. And then stories start surfacing that people who do the Pooka challenge are ending up brutally murdered.

              There are undeniably fun nods to the awful world of the internet in which we now live, like a meme of Pooka woven into “The Snowman” poster that made me laugh, but Ryan Copple’s script is better when it’s just having dumb fun in terms of action/horror. There’s something about someone in a giant Pooka costume holding on to a speeding car like he’s Mike Myers that is more fun than a lot of modern horror is allowed to be. And Brugués' approach is best in these scenes and less effective when the film tries to say anything remotely serious about trolling or internet virality.

              Worst of all, “Pooka Lives!” decides to go with a non-ending, rolling credits just as it’s about to promise its most intense action. Perhaps they suspected someone would just continue the story online. If you dare!

              Available on Hulu today, 4/3.




              Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/into-the-dark-pooka-lives-2020
              By: Brian Tallerico
              Posted: April 3, 2020, 1:46 pm

            • image

              HBO documentary series are typically a tier above other networks and “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children” is no exception. Over five hours, the producers of this series detail the Atlanta Child Murders of 1979 and 1980, in which dozens of Black children were kidnapped and murdered in the Georgia city. Forty years after the killing spree, there are still a great number of questions about how the case unfolded. As someone who knows a great deal about the case – I’m a fan of true crime series of all forms and wrote about how “Mindhunter” used this case in its second season for Vulture – I went into “The Lost Children” skeptical that it could teach me anything new about this American tragedy, but it is remarkably detailed and, most of all, compassionate in the way it approaches this story. Instead of just a typical, clinical true crime approach, the directors focus heavily on the people involved in this case, mostly the loved ones left behind. It creates a true picture of the impact of these murders and an argument that they were covered up by a city on the rise and maybe even a president who claimed to be color-blind.

              From 1979 to 1981, Atlanta was paralyzed by a string of child murders. It was mostly young boys who would go missing. Sometimes their bodies would be found quickly; sometimes it took months. At first, because the missing children were Black and poor, no one paid much attention. It wasn’t until several of the mothers of these children started pushing for media attention that the world took notice. A task force was formed but made almost no progress. A series like this could focus solely on the inadequate and arguably corrupt investigation and political establishment that wanted to sweep these cases under the rug, but this isn’t exactly that approach to this story. It’s here, of course, but you will hear more from mothers and brothers of victims than you will from police officers or politicians.

              And with a few exceptions – who are impressively given their time in front of the camera too to create a balanced impression – most of these people don’t think the case was ever really solved. Yes, a man named Wayne Williams was arrested and convicted of the two final murders, both men notably older than the typical victims, but dozens of questions remain. The final episode presents Williams’ appeal in detail I hadn’t seen before, including several alternate suspects who seem to have nearly as much evidence against them as the man the Atlanta authorities determined killed all these children. There have always been elements of the Williams case that don’t add up on either side. His story the night he was arrested never added up – he claimed he was going to an appointment that could never be confirmed – and there was suspicious activity in the days after he was first questioned. However, there are elements of pinning all of these crimes on Williams that just don’t make sense either. The theory that Williams was used as a blanket to put out the potential fire that would have started if it had been proven that a KKK member had been killing black children is given a lot of time here. Although it should be noted that there are people interviewed who know this case very well and are convinced of Williams' guilt. I almost wonder if hearing some of the evidence presented in episode five won't change their mind. 

              So how do you make a five-hour series that doesn’t reach a definitive conclusion interesting? By being this balanced in terms of information and compassion. “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered” is a delicately nuanced production that doesn’t dip too far into stories of grief or feel too clinical in its informative nature. It walks that line in the middle. It has the perfect blend of the two, taking a story with so many players and so many issues and making it feel human again. The Atlanta Child Murders were a formative event in this country in the early ‘80s. You might walk away from this series thinking that the case was correctly solved. You might walk away thinking it was merely closed to stop a race war from destroying the city. But you will definitely walk away with a clearer picture of why this story remains such a vital part of Atlanta’s history. It still feels like its final chapter has yet to be written.

              Premieres on HBO on Sunday, April 5th.




              Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/atlantas-missing-and-murdered-the-lost-children-2020
              By: Brian Tallerico
              Posted: April 3, 2020, 1:48 pm

              • Entertainer
                Entertainer published a blog post Slay The Dragon

                image

                No fairy tale prince ever took on a more terrifying monster than the "dragon" in this documentary about the massive Republican redistricting following Barack Obama's first Presidential election and the 2010 census. The dragon here refers to the anything-but-square, lizard-like shapes of the new districts, the lines drawn to make sure that even if the majority of voters support Democrats, the district-by-district returns will elect Republicans. The post-2008 re-aligning of voters to push through a conservative wish-list by focusing on state legislators and Congressional elections is the subject of "Slay the Dragon," a new documentary from Chris Durrance and Barak Goodman. One amusing sequence scrolls through maps, identifying the districts' wildly circuitous lines by the images they resemble, from "Goofy and Donald" to hanging bats, a praying mantis, and an octopus. 

                Durrance and Goodman make it clear that this tactic has been used to distort the popular vote by Democrats as well, though the Democratic sweep in 2008 took the Republican ferocity about stopping Democrats to a new level. There's a grim recognition that they can't win based on persuading voters they have better policies; they go straight to thwarting their votes. (The film barely touches on another key factor, the Supreme Court's Citizen United decision, allowing unlimited amounts of undisclosed corporate and billionaire dark money campaign contributions and lobbying expenditures.)

                The term gerrymander dates back to 1812, when Massachusetts Governor Elbridge Gerry redrew district lines to win more state senate election districts for what was then called the Democratic-Republican party. The term combines Gerry's name with the animal that the new district lines resembled—a salamander. Districts are redrawn after the census is taken every decade. When the majority of voters are opposed to your policies, it is easier to tilt the playing field through redistricting and voter suppression than to change their minds. The Republican consultant behind it all, Chris Janowski, founder of Project REDMAP (Redistricting Majority Project) is not just unapologetic; he is downright proud. He wants to assure us he's not racist, though. He says he is not trying to disenfranchise African-Americans; just Democrats. The officials are not hiding their motives, either. In an email recovered in a legal challenge, one of the people overseeing the new district lines explains that his goal is to "quarantine" as many Democratic votes as possible. Sounds undemocratic? Maybe unconstitutional? Well, not if you ask the Supreme Court, with the deciding votes cast by Trump appointees Gorsuch and Kavanaugh. 

                The Constitutional plan was to use the new data about the population to promote democracy by making districts more accurately reflect the population. But the problem with having people in power make those decisions is what economists call a moral hazard. It is just so easy to make the determination based on what they see as best for them instead of what is best for the districts, the country, democracy, or justice. And buying state and local elections are not just cheaper than federal elections; they provide more bang for the buck. All of a sudden there was money for consultants and television ads in races that had never been able to afford them before. A commenter in the film calls it "the biggest bargain and perhaps the biggest heist in modern American history." 

                And that, infuriatingly documented in this film, is what happened. Conservatives, fearing after the 2008 election that they could no longer win over voters in a demographically shifting electorate, decided to tilt the playing field so that even a majority of Democratic votes could not defeat Republican candidates. In one example, more people voted for the Democratic candidates for state office, but Republicans won 60 percent of the seats. 

                The film draws a direct (red) line between the redistricting and specific outcomes that have ranged from contrary to public opinion to catastrophic. As we learned in Michael Moore's documentary "Fahrenheit 11/9" and other examinations of the switch to a toxic water source for Flint, Michigan, "the crisis started with lines drawn on a map." Michigan Governor Rick Snyder bypassed the city government in Flint by declaring a fiscal emergency and appointing a financial manager with no oversight or accountability. The citizens voted to repeal the appointment and the post-redistricting legislature re-passed it with no repeal allowed. The financial manager switched to a new water source in 2014, which turned out to be contaminated, devastating the physical and economic health of the already-depressed town. 

                Even more toxic was the loss of faith in government, not just the elected officials but in the entire idea of democracy. But where there is a dragon, there is a slayer, and in a development no one would believe if it happened in a feature film, the slayer who takes on the challenge is a young woman whose only weapons are social media and determination. Independent voter and recent college graduate Katie Fahey invited those concerned about gerrymandering to join her in a campaign to set up a more transparent, independent system for drawing district lines. The film's most gripping scenes show her efforts to create an all-volunteer grassroots campaign that includes collecting 350,000 petition signatures and a brutal court battle.  

                Goodman and Durrance have made a dense, numbers-driven subject very accessible and they expertly balance the overwhelming bleakness and cynicism of the voter suppression effort with the integrity of those who are fighting it. They hold our attention with skillful use of animation and other visuals, touches of wry humor, and brisk pacing, but it is the heroine at the heart of the film who gives us hope and perhaps inspiration to try some town halls, petitions, and lawsuits of our own to protect the voting rights that are essential for a just and trustworthy government.

                Available on VOD today, 4/3.




                Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/slay-the-dragon-movie-review-2020
                By: Nell Minow
                Posted: April 3, 2020, 1:48 pm

                • Entertainer
                  Entertainer published a blog post Coffee & Kareem

                  image

                  Let’s set one thing straight: “Stuber” was a good movie. Yes, the title for that 2019 action-comedy with Kumail Nanjiani and Dave Bautista was silly, but that was part of its self-deprecating approach to cop comedies and knowing product placement. With its slapstick-y action sequences and potently mismatched duo, “Stuber” proved that these movies can have some juice, even if they’ve felt ironic for at least a decade. “Coffee & Kareem,” also from director Michael Dowse, is on the other hand also about dopey men in action sequences, but its cleverness goes out the window once you realize most of its edginess comes in the form of a 12-year-old's way with cuss words. "Coffee & Kareem" is stock R-rated buddy-cop comedy shenanigans by way of cuteness, and it ain't "Stuber." 

                  Written by Shane Mack, “Coffee & Kareem” pairs up a dopey cop named Coffee (Ed Helms) and a 12-year-old wise-cracking kid named Kareem (Terrence Little Gardenhigh). Kareem acts like a wannabe comedy superstar stuffed into a preteen's body, and that includes the way he delivers a raunchy poem in his class that crudely sexualizes his teacher. Coffee is dating Kareem’s mother Vanessa (Taraji P. Henson), and Kareem thinks he can change that by hiring a criminal (RonReaco Lee) to paralyze Coffee. When Coffee unwittingly drives Kareem to a rougher part of Detroit to pay said baddie, Kareem witnesses a cop killing, and it sends the two scrambling from dopey drug dealers and crooked cops. 

                  If you’re thinking about the optics of a Caucasian cop and African-American characters, so is the script, though it doesn’t have worthwhile commentary when getting loud about these dynamics. “Coffee & Kareem” proves to be tone-deaf on two levels: one with its dialogue jokes about the loaded images of seeing a white officer forcefully interacting with black men, and on a deeper level, that audiences would even find these jokes to be therapeutic, or entertaining. Instead it prods at very real wounds about race and police work in America, and it makes for miserable try-hard comedy that aims to play for both the Blue Lives Matter people and the Black Lives Matter people, but will confuse everyone. Yikes. 

                  “Coffee & Kareem” plasters its mundanity under Helms’ nose, his mustache used to make sure we know that he’s both a generic cop and also a total square. It’s not a promising start for a character we’ll be stuck with for what becomes an exhaustive 90 minutes of routine set-pieces and lazy twists, during which Coffee is emasculated by his coworkers, his target criminals, and the ball-busting 12-year-old he dashes around Detroit with. Helms’ plain but neurotic presence is often dependent on his surroundings—as in “The Office” or “Cedar Rapids”—but here it’s the sign of a big flat joke. 

                  One of the story's true heroes is Henson's Vanessa, despite her brief time on-screen. The only rational person wrangled into this mess, she calls out the very sense of insecurity underneath all the characters—good, bad, young and old—in a way that’s on-the-nose, the script making clear why every player is so clumsy and boyish in between frantic attempts at killing each other. Vanessa's maturity means she is above this childish nonsense, and the movie at least gives her a scene to unleash her fury—a slam-bang ass-whooping that shows off Dowse’s special flair for painful comedy. In 2011, Dowse made a whole movie about teeth-popping brawls in hockey, “Goon,” and Henson gives a little trace of that when facing the drug dealers herself.

                  The other hero for "Coffee & Kareem" is Betty Gilpin, and her commanding deadpan delivery. Having been given a funny but minimal role in Dowse's “Stuber,” she gets more time to run wild as a cop named Watts. She has the same kind of awareness as other characters, but her lines are far funnier because she feel fresh—Watts is a true Gilpin-grade approach to a droll woman with nothing to lose, an intriguing machine still in development after it practically saved last month's “The Hunt.” With Gilpin even more unhinged here, she’s often the grease in a lot of scenes that would be stagnant without her, and you have to wait until the story's second half for it. 

                  There just isn’t much of a movie here, or even much of an homage movie when you compare it to its clear influences like "48 Hours" and "Lethal Weapon." The winking quality doesn't even work, like when a frustrated Coffee later rolls onto his back and dramatically fires his gun in the air. Edgar Wright's homage movie “Hot Fuzz” referenced the same trope (from "Point Break"), and it was funny. Here, it happens and ends before Dowse can even fully register the joke. It’s those types of gags that just aren’t strong enough to make “Coffee & Kareem” stand out, or seem like it's building from the classics that turned buddy cop movies into a formula. Eventually “Coffee & Kareem” is just yet another action movie that ends with a big shoot-out in a dark steel mill. 

                  Available on Netflix today, 4/3.




                  Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/coffee-and-kareem-movie-review-2020
                  By: Nick Allen
                  Posted: April 3, 2020, 1:48 pm

                  • Entertainer

                    image

                    It’s hard to say a game that’s as violent and intense as the excellent “Doom Eternal” should be used as an escape, but it’s visceral approach to the First-Person Shooter has been exactly that for millions in the last two weeks. As the world shut down due to COVID-19, gamers jumped into the suit of the Doom Slayer, the one being who can save the planet from the demons of Hell in the highly-acclaimed sequel to Bethesda’s brilliant 2016 reboot of one of the most influential franchises of all time. Here at RogerEbert.com, we’ve tried to analyze the intersection of video games and narrative entertainment like film and TV. For games like “Uncharted” or “The Last of Us,” the connection is obvious—they use screenwriting and visual composition techniques directly inspired by film history. And then there are the franchises in which the games and film world intertwine like the “Resident Evil” series. For “Doom Eternal,” it’s not so much where games and film intertwine but where games and heavy metal album covers from the ‘80s intertwine. It’s a hellscape of nightmarish demons come to life, inspired more by Megadeth and H.P. Lovecraft than Steven Spielberg. And it’s a blast.

                    First, a little history. The first “Doom” was released for PCs back in 1993 and became one of the most important games of its era. For many people, myself included, this franchise was the introduction to multi-player gaming. I spent more time playing “Doom” games in college than I should have for my GPA. And it was often someone else in my dorm suite that I was killing. These games revolutionized their genre with their intense gameplay and the incredible ability to mod the worlds within the game. It’s one of the most formative games in terms of how this art form became a shared experience creatively and competitively. The amazing “Doom II” followed in 1994 and then the series moved to console with “Doom 64” in 1997. “Doom 3” was a huge event in 2004 and there was even a “Doom” movie in 2005 with Dwayne Johnson, Karl Urban, and Rosamund Pike. It’s mostly horrible, but it does have a fun sequence at the end that recreates the FPS breakthrough for which this franchise is known.

                    image

                    There were remasters and ports in the years between the movie and the reboot, but the next major event in the world of “Doom” wouldn’t come until 2016 when “Doom” made its current-gen console debut with a huge critical and commercial hit. With intense gameplay and great level design, “Doom” was an unforgettable experience, and gamers counted the days for a follow-up. No one could have predicted that a game about the end of the world would come during such a crisis, but here’s “Doom Eternal,” an incredibly addictive and intense game that doesn’t hold your hand and demands you bring all your FPS skills to the hellscape.

                    You once again play a warrior called the Doom Slayer, the only hope for humanity, and the story picks up two years after the end of the last game. The Earth has been completely decimated by demonic forces, many of them modern variations on creatures from the original ‘90s hits. The Doom Slayer now has a fortress in the sky, a base from which to travel to Earth on missions to close the portal to Hell and save humanity. He has to find and kill creatures called Hell Priests, the beings needed by a master called the Khan Maykr, who is running this whole demonic empire.

                    image

                    That’s about it. Story definitely takes a back seat to intense, non-stop action. You can rarely catch your breath in “Doom Eternal,” a game that is constantly throwing new enemies at you and giving you new tools with which to dispatch them. There’s an immediate strategy aspect to “Doom Eternal” that’s incredibly addictive once you master it. Different approaches to combat like melee vs. gunfire produce different results. Meaning if you need health or ammo, you have to instantly adjust your approach. The standard FPS works on a point-and-shoot dynamic, but one of the elements that elevates “Doom Eternal” is how much the combat of the game integrates a strategic part of your brain at the same time. Different weapons with different mods produce different results on different enemies. It’s not as simple as grabbing a gun and aiming and firing. You will not beat this game with that approach. And yet it’s all happening at 100MPH—running, gunning, modding, swapping, dying over and over and over again.

                    The result of all this non-stop intensity is remarkably cathartic in a world where we are deluged by bad news on a daily basis. “Doom Eternal” works because its adrenaline-producing speed doesn’t allow for anything but your direct concentration. Everything else, even in the era of a pandemic, fades away. Your mind can’t wander. You can’t think about the real world. There are demons to kill.

                    Doom Eternal is available now on PC, PS4, and XOne.




                    Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/balder-and-dash/escape-to-the-hellscape-of-doom-eternal
                    By: Brian Tallerico
                    Posted: April 3, 2020, 4:14 pm

                  • image

                    It’s likely that one might read the title “World on Fire” in this particular moment in time and think, “nah, gonna steer clear of that one.” I can’t blame you. It hardly sounds like escapist fare, and it must be said that this war drama isn’t exactly comfort food or pleasant in a kind of familiar, mind-numbing way. If you want to just re-watch “The Office,” no judgments; if you think this is the perfect time to embrace the surreal, dopey madness of reality shows like Netflix’s “The Circle,” you’re probably right. But if what you want is to be engaged—to be sucked into a story completely, enveloped by another time and place—then the BBC’s epic World War II series might be just the ticket. 

                    Premiering in the U.S on April 5 on PBS after bowing in the U.K. in September of last year (and already set for a second season), Peter Bowker’s “World On Fire” does one thing that seems especially appropriate right now: It focuses on the lives of people far from the podiums and big historical moments. Nor is its storytelling limited to one country or perspective. These seven episodes sprawl out from two characters, but they’re not the leads of a massive cast of supporting players. This is a true ensemble. So yes, we begin with Harry (Jonah Hauer-King) and Lois (Julia Brown), two young lovers boldly shouting down some British fascists, but within moments we’re introduced to Lois’s father Douglas (Sean Bean) and Harry’s mother Robina (Lesley Manville); a jump forward in time introduces us to the family that Harry, a translator, is staying with in Poland, including the soft-spoken but brave Kasia (Zofia Wichłacz) and her brothers. Harry’s neighbor is Nancy (Helen Hunt), an American radio journalist typically stationed in Berlin, who has a nephew (Brian J. Smith) working as a doctor in Paris; the list goes on (and on, and on). 

                    image

                    If that seems like a lot, it is. And there’s quite a bit more, including Polish resistance fighters, a German couple trying to hide their daughter’s epilepsy from the doctors who would euthanize her, Nancy’s Nazi handler, some jazz musicians, many soldiers and sailors, and so on. While this makes some of the characters harder to latch onto than others—every storyline is intense, so when someone disappears for a spell, the mind does tend to wander—it’s to Bowker’s credit that all the characters are reasonably well-developed, and a fairly high number are consistently engaging and complex. The Nazis are an exception to this rule, but a welcome one—this isn’t a both-sides-now kind of story, and the only Nazis that aren’t unabashedly racist monsters are by and large devices of the plot, intended to remind us that wars are often fought by terrified teenagers. 

                    War isn’t just the setting here, either. Bowker’s characters often reckon with the costs of war, but they also tend to struggle with their own ideas about it. This is especially true of Bean and Manville’s characters (both excellent, which will surprise precisely no one who’s even seen either of them act in anything). Douglas, a pacifist still struggling with shellshock years after his experiences in the Battle of the Somme, struggles to with the parameters of beliefs that had seemed absolute, particularly when his troubled son (Ewan Mitchell) joins up. His intellectual and emotional struggles are further spurred by Robina, who seems to relish an uncomfortable conversation and has her own complicated relationship with the cost of war, albeit one she keeps sealed behind the traditional stiff upper lip. There’s also an awkwardly charming pilot (“Doctor Who” alumnus Arthur Darvill, also a standout) who says he fights so that other people have the freedom to go on living however they choose, his blunt acknowledgment that his job is to kill people plays as a person trying desperately to acclimate themselves to a horrifying reality, and call it by its name.

                    image

                    That name is war, and it’s present even when it’s not. Directors Chanya Button, Adam Smith, Andy Wilson, and Thomas Napper all manage to convey the abruptness of danger; you’re safe until you’re not, you round a corner and death waits. Nor, with the exception of Dunkirk (not Christopher Nolan-level stuff, but still pretty affecting), does the series interest itself in the big historical events. This is a story of life during the war: The young officer learning how to lead as he and his men do nothing but retreat toward the sea in a series of increasingly distressing but tactically insignificant skirmishes; the singer who can spot the shellshocked men in her audience in seconds; the young waitress who, just when she thinks she’s reached her breaking point, finds even more places to shatter. People drink coffee and check the mail and run errands, but always, disaster looms.

                    Not every scene is a winner. Bowker exercises admirable restraint through much of the series, allowing the horror and tragedy to speak for itself, but when he does lean on the gas, it can break the spell a bit (a mid-season singalong is particularly irksome). But even when the storylines don’t weave together perfectly or the story gets a bit precious, “World on Fire” remains engaging, because the cast understands exactly what’s being asked of them and by and large refuse to oversell. In addition to Bean, Manville, and the late-arriving Darvill, Hunt is predictably excellent; sometimes her broadcasts feel a bit too much like convenient history lessons, but her performance is never less than wholly compelling. Brown and Wichłacz are similarly successful, and Brown and Manville are largely responsible for the show’s brief moments of levity, with Manville in particular expertly balancing the need for a solid punchline with the character’s use of acerbic humor as a defense mechanism. (“Scotland? As if going through Dunkirk wasn’t suffering enough.”)

                    It’s not light viewing. It also betrays no interest in the torn-flag-waving-boldly-in-the-rubble kind of patriotism often typical of war epics. “World on Fire” and Bowker wisely stay away from such things, and by eschewing the Churchills of the world in favor of the people just trying to get by, they create an ensemble war drama that never loses focus. No, it’s not going to take your mind off the world’s troubles. But it’s honest about the troubles of that era, and about how hard it can be to simply keep going when everything’s turned upside down. 




                    Original: https://www.rogerebert.com/demanders/world-on-fire-tv-review
                    By: Allison Shoemaker
                    Posted: April 3, 2020, 7:35 pm

                    • STAT Times
                      STAT Times shared a link
                      Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Unite team up to fly medical supplies for NHS
                      • STAT Times
                        STAT Times shared a link
                        Atlas Air spearheads Project Airbridge to move medical supplies
                        • STAT Times
                          STAT Times shared a link
                          cargo-partner expands LCL services from Europe to China
                          • STAT Times
                            STAT Times shared a link
                            DB Schenker moves 10 million masks, medical supplies across the globe
                            • STAT Times
                              STAT Times shared a link

                              Webinar: The air cargo challenge in the midst of COVID-19

                              www.stattimes.com

                              Demand outstrips supply - The air cargo challenge in a pandemic

                              • STAT Times
                                STAT Times shared a link
                                • STAT Times
                                  STAT Times shared a link
                                  Cologne Bonn Airport sees 700 cargo flights in a week